In de-escalation training for police officers, it is vital for them to prepare for situations that require less-lethal options. CEW devices and OC sprays are both important assets to officer’s belts and practicing utilization of these devices within realistic scenario training is sure to have them prepared for the field.

VirTra developed an un-tethered, true-to-life way for departments to train with their less-lethal options. With our Axon® TASER® and SABRE® compatible technology, officers can train with their own devices within the simulators for maximum realism. VirTra ensures that de-escalation police training is taken to the highest standard.

 

TASER® Compatibility

Part of what makes VirTra training so unique is that we are the only company in the U.S. that is able to provide a laser-based training cartridge used inside simulation for the TASER® line! VirTra offers variety in our TASER compatible products, providing three separate cartridge products that drop into the TASER simulator housings.

V-X26P™ TASER Simulation Cartridges

This TASER simulator cartridge’s probe spread is accurately displayed just like in real life, no matter how far the trainee is away from the screen.

V-TX2™ TASER Simulation Cartridges

This cartridge contains a seven-degree probe spread allowing precise and accurate target engagement.

V-T7™ Simulation Cartridges

VirTra’s newest TASER simulator cartridge contains a 12-degree probe spread that is ideal for close-quarter (CQ) engagement. The other includes a 3.5-degree spread for farther distance targets.

Though unique in their own ways, each model is able to assign unique laser IDs to track and score each probe placement. Upon deployment, the on-screen simulation characters will react accordingly providing trainees a realistic view of their target proficiency and de-escalation skills. Trainees are then able to evaluate their performance, continue to practice and always continue to improve through VirTra’s de-escalation training for police officers.

 

SABRE® Compatibility and More

VirTra also developed a laser OC device that fits inside of a SABRE® MK3 canister, matching the exact form, function, and weight of the actual OC canister! This provides a way for officers to safely practice deploying their OC spray and, just the same as the CEW cartridges, the simulation characters display a realistic reaction for officers to learn from. Other less-lethal items include batons, gas grenades, bean bags and more.

All of our less-lethal product options benefit officers in receiving true-to-life de-escalation police training while also helping make sure that they return home safely each day.

 

Reach Out to Us!

We are always here to help answer any questions you may have about our less-lethal products, TASER simulator cartridges, and more. Contact us today!

Just as police officers go through intensive training on skills such as firearm manipulation and de-escalation, peace officers must also. Though the positions of certain peace officers may look different than a police officer, they still are protecting the public, enforcing the law and, depending on their position, carrying firearms.

Whether a state trooper, detention officer, border patrol, or even game warden, proper peace officer training is crucial in keeping communities safe and getting people home safely.

VirTra’s training systems provide various scenarios and curriculums to educate and train those who keep us safe.

De-Escalation Tactics

When protecting the public, there is always the possibility that peace officers will face a situation where they need to use quick decision-making, situational awareness, and other important skills that VirTra training simulators put to the test.

VirTra’s V-VICTA® curriculum contains various de-escalation scenarios dealing with mental illness, emotionally disturbed people, autism awareness, and more that officers may come in contact with when working. Our curriculum provides 60 hours of nationally certified coursework including PowerPoints, manuals, pre-tests and post-tests. Instructors have all the necessary tools to instill proper training and knowledge transfer to its students.

With different branching options for every scenario, officers can explore different ways that their decisions affect people and themselves. With this, they can learn from both their mistakes and successes.

Firearm Training

It is necessary for all peace officers to properly train with their firearms in the case that they will need to utilize it on a call. VirTra provides an array of firearms training for peace officers to hone in on their skills.

This peace officer training might include marksmanship, weapon transitions, and even gauging the right times for them to draw their firearm. VirTra’s firearm training is the most accurate in the industry. It even includes structured scenario debriefs for trainers and officers to analyze their skills.

The curriculum also includes training scenarios including active shooter, tourniquet application and even more that officers might experience.

We Are Here to Help!

Our curriculum and simulators are an effective and educational addition to any peace officer training. Those who protect us deserve great training that is proven to work and VirTra is just that.

To learn more about the V-VICTA® curriculum and our simulators, contact a VirTra specialist.

 

In 2015 a Georgia deputy shot and killed an unarmed, mentally unstable man just outside of the local grocery store. The man had been singing scripture inside the store and then telling employees that they were fired and to turn in their keys. After store employees called 911, the off-duty deputy responded to the call and encountered the man in his vehicle. The man ignored the deputy and walked toward him, singing just as he did in the store. The officer unsuccessfully deployed his electronic control device, which angered the subject. He then cocked his fist and charged the officer.

20 minutes after the shooting, the veteran officer of 13 years turned to a fellow officer and said “You know the bad thing about it…? I could’ve fought him.” Not only could he have used defense tactics on this man, but he could have also attempted to de-escalate the situation. But that never occurred to this officer. That may be due to the fact that in his more than 600 hours of ongoing training, he didn’t have a single hour of de-escalation training.

Look at your training records. Go ahead, take a look. Out of all the hours that are being spent on training, how many of them are on use of force? How many of them involve an officer using an electronic control device or a firearm? How about O.C. or some type of defensive tactics? Now look at how much time is spent on communication. Specifically, de-escalation communication. Now, I’m not here to say how many hours of de-escalation training you should see, but there should be quite a few. Why? Because the number one thing that officers do is talk to people. We talk to people a lot more than we use force. And we have the ability to talk some people out of situations where force might otherwise be necessary.

As a law enforcement trainer, and a content creator at VirTra, I know how important it is that we equip our officers with every tool they may need out there. Not training officers in de-escalation is no longer an option. Thankfully, VirTra has you covered!

Our training simulator is not just designed for use of force encounters. It is also an amazing resource for de-escalation training. Currently, there are over 50 scenarios that can be used for training officers in de-escalation.

For example, the scenario “Homeless Contact at Business” can be used for a variety of training events. The training officer can choose how the suspect reacts based on the verbalization techniques of the officer. While the homeless subject can become extremely agitated because he is being kicked out of his “home,” the officer can de-escalate the situation by offering assistance or by having the business manager give the man some time to pack up and leave the area. In just this one scenario, there are multiple options in ways that the man can be de-escalated from an upset state of mind. Conversely, the man can also become more upset if the officer doesn’t adjust their communication.

The great part about using a VirTra simulator for this type of training is that you don’t have to dedicate large amounts of time to get high-quality training. There’s virtually no setup time, no need for actors or complex scripts. VirTra does the heavy lifting for you! These scenarios are perfect for officers to do right after roll-call. They could go through up to 5 scenarios in just 15 minutes before they hit the road. This type of short, yet frequent training is a great way to ingrain these principles.

As trainers, we have the responsibility of putting tools onto our officers “tool belts.” When we train firearms, electronic control devices, O.C. and defensive tactics, each one of those ends up on their tool belts. Officers will only use the tools that were taught to them effectively and frequently. When we fail to properly train them, they will be forced to choose from the tools available. And, much like woodworking, it never turns out good if you don’t have the right tools for the job.

Train hard! Stay safe!

If we pooled law enforcement officers, we would find many different definitions regarding de-escalation. Is it a tactic? A tool? A goal? An outcome? A process? A buzzword in check the box training to placate the public, the media, or even management?

A second question…who is de-escalation for? A person with mental illness? In crisis? Someone exhibiting bizarre behavior? For yourself?

De-escalation is not a ‘result’ or an ‘outcome’ but a process.  It is a strategic approach to problem solving. It is part of an effective strategy to reduce the intensity of volatile situations balanced with reducing the necessity or level of force required for a positive outcome. De-escalation mirrors chess. It is strategic. Methodical. Systematic. It takes time to make the decisions needed for a win in chess. In our case, the win is a successful resolution. However, chess players have an abundance of what law enforcement does not always have…time.

Policing is a profession of emotions; the emotions of the person we interact with and our own emotions. We have a responsibility and obligation to remain calm and in control of ourselves. In that sense, the de-escalation process applies to officers as well. In essence, policing is a profession of managing emotions, ours included.

Should we abandon a sound tactical response in the de-escalation process? No. People in a crisis like state or who exhibit bizarre behavior are unpredictable and volatile. That brings with it the potential for violence. Perception drives behavior. Distance, space, and time are critical tools. We know we don’t always have those, but don’t overlook the potential to create them.

Can officers truly de-escalate people? No. The best negotiator in the world doesn’t de-escalate anyone. We can build rapport and relationships, but what that provides is time for emotions to change and evolve. What we truly do is allow the space for individuals to de-escalate themselves if de-escalation is possible at all.

De-escalation is not always possible. There is no magic phrase or magic wand that guarantees it can or will happen. If we cannot connect with someone, we cannot allow the space for de-escalation through verbal techniques and conversation.

Does de-escalation mean force is never required? No. A person’s behavior dictates the use of force. What doesn’t dictate use of force is a crisis state or whether someone has a mental illness. The crisis state doesn’t attempt to kill or harm people. Mental illness doesn’t attempt to kill or harm people. What creates the potential for violence is contaminated thinking, hallucinations, delusions…whatever it is that distorts a person’s perception of reality and their interaction with it.

The opposite end of that spectrum is choice. There are people in this world that want to harm and kill others. It is deliberate, it is purposeful, and it is almost impossible to de-escalate that through verbal techniques. Where is that conversation among law enforcement “leaders” when discussions of mandated de-escalation occur?

De-escalation can be a complex process. It requires critical thinking skills. It requires an understanding of human behavior. It requires tactical skills. It requires reading the situation correctly and implementing what is best in that moment…if there is time. IF there is time.

VirTra recognizes that it is critical to create the proper environment to develop the skills necessary to help facilitate the de-escalation process.

Suicide by cop, often abbreviated to SBC, is an event that has two victims: the suicidal subject and the officer. These calls are incredibly difficult for everyone involved and officers must be prepared to handle any outcome. At the end of the day, law enforcement are forced with two major situations: maintaining safety and trying to de-escalate the subject.

SBC occurs when a suicidal individual engages in criminal behavior in an attempt to elicit lethal use of force from law enforcement. A 2019 article by The Washington Post estimates that about 100 fatal police shootings per year are SBC events. While occasionally some SBC subjects are armed with a firearm, many times they possess a knife or feign weapon possession.

There are different strategies used by individuals attempting SBC. Some of them plan ahead and orchestrate the situation while others occur due to a minor event that became escalated. For an integrated response, officers must take each call seriously and secure the scene appropriately. Only after can they determine the main problem and assess the risk of suicidality.

There are ways to talk a subject down and possibly prevent escalation:

  • Provide reassurance
  • Comply with reasonable requests
  • Offer realistic optimism
  • Consider non-lethal containment
  • Be careful not to let one’s guard down or be baited

While it may seem like common knowledge, it must be remembered that a person attempting SBC is suffering from a mental illness or experiencing some type of crisis. De-escalation and crisis de-escalation training can be of great assistance during SBC calls.

VirTra offers multiple scenarios as well as V-VICTA™ NCP-certified curriculum to help officers prepare for harrowing calls. These are designed by VirTra’s subject matter experts and certified by IADLEST to ensure knowledge takeaway. Some courses that focus on SBC and related situations include De-Escalation, Crisis De-Escalation and Mental Illness.

To allow your agency to experience a higher standard in training, contact a product specialist.

In the year 2020, there were 1,021 police-related fatalities across the United States. This is a number that has been steadily rising for years. It is a difficult situation for officers to be in, as use of force can be required to save the lives of civilians and the officers themselves—though in today’s world, it is often met with a media firestorm.

So what is a department to do? At times, it can feel like a no-win situation, since officers are following department protocol in dealing with a dangerous, non-compliant subject. Yet, the number of deaths continue to rise and so does pressure on departments.

One option to reduce the number of police-related fatalities and prevent media attacks is having a heavier focus on use of force training. Ideally, this would focus on increasing tactical skills, de-escalation techniques and weapon transitions between firearm and less lethal, and vice versa:

Increasing Tactical Skills

In order to maintain control over a situation, law enforcement officers must be able to maintain the tactical advantage—always be one step ahead of the subjects. This type of experience is difficult to recreate in a training environment, unless instructors utilize a real-life training simulator. Immersing officers in high-resolution video and the surround sound of high-stress situations is one of the best ways for trainees to practice gaining and keeping control of the situation. Skills learned in the simulator are easier to transfer to the field, making this form of training incredibly valuable.

De-Escalation Techniques

The first step to gaining control of the situation is attempting to de-escalate before less lethal or lethal force is required. However, not all interactions are simple, and therefore officers must know a variety of de-escalation tactics. VirTra partnered with Vistelar, a company specializing in conflict resolution, to create nationally-certified de-escalation training for officers. Departments who implement this training teach their officers how to work through conflicts verbally while recognizing important facial and body cues.

Weapon Transitions

Depending if the subject chooses to escalate the situation or become compliant to de-escalation tactics, officers need to know how to quickly transition between lethal and less lethal devices. Don’t be fooled by the simplicity; it is critical officers understand the tactical considerations of moving from one weapon to another, know how to improve speed and transition quality, and recognize time constraints with each. VirTra also offers nationally-certified training curriculum on this topic, which is paired with real-life scenarios. This allows trainees to learn the concept in the classroom before putting it into practice in the simulator.

The more departments push use of force and de-escalation training, the more ready their officers will be for the unforeseeable events in the field. Experience and knowledge go hand-in-hand in gaining control of a situation, which is why VirTra creates real-life scenarios for officers to practice in. Learn more by contacting a VirTra specialist.

When used properly, de-escalation can reduce police use of force.

And while not every situation permits de-escalation—as some subjects are noncompliant no matter the calming tactic used—there are certainly other times when the proper tone of voice or phase can reduce the chance of a subject becoming out of control.

Recently, many agencies have updated their training to heavily focus on de-escalation and thus lower the frequency of force used by their officers. To help further this training, VirTra has produced two different nationally-certified de-escalation curricula that is free for all law enforcement customers.

This training—De-Escalation and Crisis De-Escalation—has a total of 6 training hours which encompasses vigorous coursework, educational presentations and real-life training video scenarios. As nationally-certified materials, they fall under the V-VICTA—Virtual Interactive Coursework Academy— program, along with other modern, skill-building critical curriculum.

De-Escalation Curriculum

Born from a partnership between VirTra and the conflict experts at VISTELAR, this 4-hour course breaks down interactions and allows officers to train on their simulator how to de-escalate situations before they become detrimental.

Crisis De-Escalation Curriculum

This 2-hour course is designed to help officers better identify crisis behaviors and use their VirTra simulator’s real-world scenarios to practice their skills. Like “De-Escalation” and other V-VICTA courses, Crisis De-Escalation provides ample time for training in lifelike scenarios.

With a wide variety of environments, situations and subjects, instructors have an extensive choice of training options for their officers. Everything from unruly bystanders to emotionally disturbed persons – VirTra aims to cover as much territory as possible to prepare law enforcement men and women for the unpredictable situations that may happen in the field.

For more information on V-VICTA and how it can provide effective training for your agency, please contact a VirTra specialist.

It is no surprise: we live in a time of ever-changing curriculum standards, training topics and law enforcement technologies. In regards to training, events in the past few years have stirred up nationwide discussions, which have further contributed to the redesign and rebuilding of our training programs.

As an instructor, it is your job to stay up-to-date with these trends and supply your officers with the much-needed training. TJ Alioto, VirTra Subject Matter Expert, broke down some of these topics in his 2021 ILEETA Presentation:

De-Escalation

This is arguably one of the most requested (and demanded) tactics in the history of police training. De-escalation is complicated, as it encompasses many factors: words/phrases used, tone, body language, etc. Teaching officers to correctly read the situation and know the best form of de-escalation is a critical, though complicated, ability to teach.

Minimal Use of Force

While de-escalation may result in no force being used, minimal use of force focuses on using the smallest amount of force to achieve the desired result: control over the situation, a subdued subject, etc. This helps officers to learn the best form of force to use, in addition to times when lesser uses of force would actually be inadequate.

Implicit Bias

One difficulty as an instructor is deciding if there are even issues that need to be trained. One way to test implicit bias is by utilizing a training simulator, such as VirTra’s simulators. Officers can run through the same situation with the only change being to the subject(s) race and gender. Provided scenario metrics can be tracked to determine if an officer or agency is treating people differently based on race or gender.

Mentally Ill & Homeless

Currently, there are record numbers of homeless and mentally ill people living on the streets. As this number rises, officers need to be armed with knowledge of how to best answer these calls. Training simulators can teach officers to recognize various mental illnesses and the appropriate responses, while providing them with scenarios to practice these newly developed skills.

To learn more about current trends and policing, download VirTra Subject Matter Expert TJ Alioto’s 2021 ILEETA presentation.

Download the presentation here.

As discussed in a previous article, verbal de-escalation is an incredibly complex tactic. There are a wide variety of factors at play, ranging from the subject’s state of mind, their ability to be persuaded and any immediate dangers in the environment. Do note: these factors only encompass those officers cannot necessarily control.

In regards to factors officers can control in de-escalation, these include issuing different de-escalating phrases, attempting to build a connection with the subject, using calmer tones and engaging in softer body language. After all, an officer must choose peaceful tones and body language to match the words they are issuing. Speaking calmly, but holding a threatening stance will not persuade a subject.

Building These Skills

Fortunately, mastering verbal de-escalation and pairing it with appropriate body language is a skill that can be developed before an officer’s feet hit the pavement—and before they are in a potentially life-and-death situation.

It all begins in the classroom. Trainees are taught about de-escalation: the various tactics, its importance in the field, examples from case studies and so forth. Building this understanding is critical. After, trainees must practice de-escalation in length in real-life situations.

This is where VirTra’s immersive simulators come into play. Trainees step into the simulator and are surrounded by a real-life scenario chosen by the instructor. From there, the student officer must analyze the situation and respond to the subject, putting into practice the de-escalation skills taught in the classroom.

Perfecting These Skills

Depending on the words and body language issued by the trainee, the instructor can choose for the scenario to branch off into a different ending. For example, if the officer is successful in demonstrating correct verbal de-escalation, the instructor can program the subject to comply and the scenario to end.

But in instances where a student is not employing techniques properly, instructors can make the scenario escalate and become notionally dangerous—thus showing officers the real-life consequences of their actions. Due to the nature of simulation training, officers are able to try de-escalating scenarios repeatedly, making for consistent, reliable training.

Start practicing these critical skills in a safe, controlled environment.

To learn more or to request a demonstration, contact a VirTra representative.

Training should be challenging. Period.

Easy training does not teach individuals, it does not force them to learn, grow, mess up and learn from mistakes. Instead, training needs to be as challenging as it is encompassing of many different topics. For police, this includes a wider variety of topics and the important nature of these subjects.

One critical lesson is verbal de-escalation.

Factors in Verbal De-Escalation

Verbal de-escalation is more complex than the public may imagine, as it is considerably more than simply asking subjects if they are okay, how they can help or if they are willing to remain calm. Instead, the correct dialogue depends on the situation, subject, the subject’s state of mind and even the tone the officer uses.

Tone is an important part of verbal de-escalation, though it isn’t discussed much. Imagine a situation where a subject is debating whether or not to end their life by jumping off a bridge. As the first responder, it is your job to talk them down—literally and figuratively.

What an officer chooses to say is magnified by the tone they use. In this situation, if an officer injected heavy amounts of false sympathy in their voice, the suicidal subject might see this as mistrust or mockery. Or if an officer used the proper phrases with little to no feeling, the subject could interpret it as sarcasm or lack of concern. Tone can greatly improve a situation or cause it to devolve—fast.

Training De-Escalation Tactics

This is where VirTra’s training simulators make a difference in the classroom. Instructors can program the simulator to run scenarios ranging from high-stake situations to mental illness interactions. Trainees can engage the subjects and attempt to defuse the situation using known de-escalation techniques, or opt for less lethal or lethal options as a last resort.

If an officer is attempting to build a rapport with the subject, instructors can choose to reward the student’s behavior and de-escalate the scenario. However, if an officer’s words or tone are too aggressive, the instructor can choose an escalating branch built within the scenario to show the trainee the consequences.

An officer’s verbal ability is another tool on their toolbelt and can mean the difference between having to fight a subject or talking him into a set of handcuffs peacefully. By training your department in proper de-escalation techniques with VirTra you can potentially decrease police use of force incidents.

If you have any questions or would like a demonstration, contact a VirTra representative.