I remember teaching at the police academy and as I was in the middle of telling a story to the class, one of the recruits spouted off, “You’re just making that up! There’s no way that really happened!” My response was simple: “Listen, if I was making it up, I would make up something you’d believe.”

What was the point of me mentioning this story? Well, if you’ve been in law enforcement for more than a day, you probably already figured out that anything can happen, at any time, at any place. Nothing is off limits. And that can include you responding to an active threat or active killer within a place of worship. Mass chaos ensues.

From 2006 – 2016, there were approximately 147 instances of gunfire on church grounds, resulting in 240 wounded and 84 deaths. (Lindner, 2023) The number of incidents occurring inside a place of worship continues to increase. If your jurisdiction includes any type of a place of worship, you need to include these types of locations in your training. Thankfully, VirTra has done the hard work for you!

There are 4 new active threat/active killer scenarios that all take place within a place of worship. The scenarios will be installed on your VirTra system during your next service update (if you have an active service plan).

“Mass Chaos” starts off with a growing number of 911 calls reporting an active shooter in a church. The calls continue, until they come to an incredibly loud crescendo, leading to the emergency dispatch to officers.

The scenario opens to the exterior of a church with law enforcement moving to stop the threat, and parishioners attempting to flee the scene. Within this multi-incident scenario, officers will have to make split-second decisions on who may or may not be a threat. They will also be tested on shot placement, accountability and maintaining their areas of responsibility. Single engagements, non-engagements and even hostage situations can all be used within the scenario.

The three other scenarios that are being released have all been made using “Mass Chaos” as a base. It has been subdivided into scenarios titled “Church Crisis,” “Holy Moly” and “Holy Hostage.”

These smaller scenarios utilize single engagements from the “Mass Chaos” incident, as well as additional assets using our V-Author® character library. We’ve also filmed an additional walk-up video for “Holy Hostage” to make it a more unique and unpredictable training event for the students to go through.

These scenarios combine an amazing blend of realistic radio traffic, panicked church goers and special effects that will raise the heartrate of even your most veteran officers. If you add VirTra’s V-Threat-Fire® device to the training, you’ll have added real-world consequences to the simulation.

VirTra is always looking to add new content to our training simulators. Look out for Mass Chaos, Church Crisis, Holy Hostage and Holy Moly during your next update!

Stay Safe!

 

References

Lindner, J. (2023, December 20). Church Shooting Statistics: Market Report & Data. Retrieved from Gitnux: htps://gitnux.org/church-shootng-statistics/

With all the conditions and variables that occur on the field, shouldn’t your training reflect as many of them as possible? Not every room has lights on or available, and the sun is down for about half of each day. It is for this reason that VirTra made sure that low light training is available for both marksmanship training and scenario training.

Training Benefits

We don’t realize the benefits of a well-lit space until we are without one. In the dark, stress levels go up and even with the beam of a flashlight, there are still areas we cannot see. Looking for a subject that is on the move and possibly dangerous in a dark place is a great way to increase officers’ cognitive load and help them make the right decisions under stress.

Additional training points include using a handheld flashlight while suddenly having to get your lethal or less-lethal tool. What if you have to transition weapons while holding your handheld flashlight? Going from lethal to less-lethal or vice versa is a vital skill to practice, with even more challenge if it is done in low light.

Low Light in Scenarios

Many people are only familiar with the variable light settings in V-Marksmanship. In fact, you can make any scenario a low light one. For example, in the new Mass Chaos active threat scenario, you can dim or eliminate light as if the power went out, adding an extra element of uncertainty.

Of course, to combat this just as one would in real life, users can pull out their flashlight. VirTra’s V-G2X handheld flashlights utilize laser technology to light up the direction it is pointed in. V-Lux™ technology allows the beam to smoothly go from screen to screen for agencies with multi-screen systems. More than one flashlight can be used at a time, making it just as useful for training multiple officers at once.

Low Light in Marksmanship

Along with the variable weather conditions, wind speed/direction, and layout of our simulated ranges, instructors can also control the lighting. It can be nighttime on the range in your VirTra simulator, with the only light to rely on being your rifle-mounted flashlight.

Just like with the handheld flashlight, the V-TLR-7A rail mounted flashlight allows for efficient transitions between screens without interruptions. Since both lights utilize the OEM housing, there will not be training scars as it perfectly replicates one of the popular rail mounted flashlights.

Situations do not often occur under perfect conditions. Make sure your officers are prepared for low light events – plus many others that VirTra has available. Talk to a specialist to incorporate a VirTra simulator into your agency’s training regimen.

CHANDLER, Ariz. — February 15, 2024 — VirTra, Inc. (Nasdaq: VTSI) (“VirTra” or the “Company”), a global provider of judgmental use of force training simulators, firearms training simulators for the law enforcement and military markets, has today announced that CEO John Givens was appointed Chairman of the Board for National Center for Simulation (NCS), an association of defense companies, government, academic, and modeling and simulations industry members.

Givens has been an executive committee member on the Board of Directors for NCS for 6 years and has held the secretary, treasurer, and co-Chair providing valuable experience and insight to its industry members. This position of Chair is a two-year term. In addition to his positions as CEO of VirTra, and previously President of Bohemia Interactive Simulations, Givens continues his mission to increase awareness and use of simulations across a broad spectrum of industries.

“This is an incredible honor, and I’m thankful for the chance to work with such talented people on this executive board and across this great industry,” said Givens about his position. “It continues to amaze me that when I started in this modeling and simulation industry, how little simulation was being utilized compared to today, where we see its use in our DoD sector and areas we never guessed would use simulation. I look forward to the future of this organization and extending the outreach even further.”

George Cheros, NCS president and CEO, added “we’re extremely proud of the quality of all our board members, and we’re excited to see John and the executive committee continue to lead NCS to new levels of excellence.” To view the current Board of Directors, visit this link here.

As the simulation industry continues to rapidly expand, VirTra aims to continue its legacy of being a pioneer of simulation training technology and adapt to the changes in the defense space and support the efforts of the National Center for Simulation.

 

About NCS

The National Center for Simulation is a non-profit trade association in Orlando, Florida, whose vision is to lead the growth of modeling, simulation, and training. NCS is committed to promoting MS&T technology expansion, supporting education and workforce development, and providing business development support to its members. www.simulationinformation.com.

About VirTra, Inc.

VirTra (Nasdaq: VTSI) is a global provider of judgmental use of force training simulators and firearms training simulators for the law enforcement, military, educational and commercial markets. The company’s patented technologies, software, and scenarios provide intense training for de-escalation, judgmental use-of-force, marksmanship, and related training that mimics real-world situations. VirTra’s mission is to save and improve lives worldwide through practical and highly effective virtual reality and simulator technology. Learn more about the company at www.VirTra.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

The information in this discussion contains forward-looking statements and information within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities

Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, which are subject to the “safe harbor” created by those sections. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “projects,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Actual results or events could differ materially from the plans, intentions and expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements that we make. The forward-looking statements are applicable only as of the date on which they are made, and we do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements in this document are made based on our current expectations, forecasts, estimates and assumptions, and involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results or events to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. In evaluating these statements, you should specifically consider various factors, uncertainties and risks that could affect our future results or operations. These factors, uncertainties and risks may cause our actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statement set forth in the reports we file with or furnish to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). You should carefully consider these risks and uncertainties described and other information contained in the reports we file with or furnish to the SEC before making any investment decision with respect to our securities. All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement.

Investor Relations Contact:

Matt Glover and Alec Wilson

Gateway Group, Inc. VTSI@gateway-grp.com

949-574-3860

Are you new to VirTra simulator training? If you want to jump right into effective training but feel overwhelmed, there is an option to help you instruct your class.

VirTra – Virtual Instructor, typically shortened to V-VI™, is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the training content on your simulator. A virtual instructor will appear onscreen and highlight important training details in the selected scenario.

Numerous scenarios have a V-VI option which can be activated by the click of a button. Categories include:

  • High risk vehicle stops
  • Emotionally disturbed person (EDP)
  • Domestic violence
  • Ambushes
  • Tourniquet application
  • And more

Additionally, instructors can view specific considerations to look for when an officer is using the simulator. By utilizing this “train the trainer” feature, instructors can fully understand the purpose of the training event and the actions student officers should take when going through the scenario.

Additional Training

VirTra also recommends courses for both new and experienced instructors and operators. Whether it is to learn best practices on a new simulator or get the advanced ins-and-outs of simulator operation, there are courses instructed by experts available.

ATCC – Advanced Trainer Certification Course – is designed for trainers with a minimum of six months of experience using their VirTra simulator. It is fast-paced and spans across 5 days, taking place at VirTra’s Training Center at the Chandler, AZ headquarters.

VirTra Master Class is a newly developed course that helps new users learn skills beyond basic operation and “button-ology.” Students will learn how to conduct debrief sessions, build training events, and become familiar with the VirTra simulator’s capabilities.

Check out our available training courses here, or contact a product specialist to learn more.

Written by Lon Bartel of VirTra

Published by Law Officer here

As part of the 2024 SHOT Show Law Enforcement Education Program Force Science’s Von Kliem and I reinforced the benefits of random practice over block practice in law enforcement skills training.  Graduates of VirTra’s Advanced Trainer Certification Course or the Force Science Methods of Instruction Course are familiar with the research detailing the advantages of random practice for skill development. For those yet to be exposed to these advanced concepts, this article will outline the importance of random practice and its transformative effects on law enforcement training.

The Traditional Approach: Block Practice

Law enforcement training has primarily relied on block practice for decades.  In block practice, a single skill or technique is repeated repetitively before moving on to the next. This path allows the trainee to improve at each repetition of the skill, and most will show improvement over time. While block practice has short term benefits, it falls short in preparing officers for the dynamic and unpredictable nature of real-world policing. Block practice can lead to rote memorization and the illusion of proficiency, but it fails to prepare officers to adapt and apply skills in complex situations.

Random Practice

Random practice involves mixing and varying skill sets in training sessions. With random practice, officers must constantly shift their focus and adapt to different demands, a process that more closely replicates real-life challenges. This method enhances skill transfer, promotes critical thinking, and improves decision-making. Although practice sessions will predictably involve more frequent errors and improper skill choices, the long-term benefits are undeniable.

Advantages of Random Practice for Law Enforcement Training

Adaptability: Random practice better simulates the unpredictable nature of law enforcement situations, preparing officers to respond effectively and swiftly in various scenarios. Instead of telling officers to deploy to a location where they will “draw and fire two rounds,” officers will be required to evaluate the problem, filter the signals, and identify the relevant information for decision-making and skill selection. Random practice fosters the ability to think on your feet and make split-second decisions, skills that are critical in high-pressure situations.

Retention and Transfer: By practicing a range of skills in a diverse and unexpected manner, officers are better able to retain and transfer their knowledge to new situations. Officers rarely get to execute a set play against a predictable offense.  Instead, they learn to adjust among effective choice options identified and developed with random practice. This promotes a deeper understanding of the skills’ underlying principles, making it easier to apply them in unfamiliar contexts. Random practice challenges officers to think and problem-solve, improving their overall skill set. It helps them recognize patterns, adapt strategies, and develop a well-rounded approach to handling varied and novel situations.

Conclusion: Bringing Awareness to the Potential of Random Practice

Understanding the benefits of random practice begins with education and awareness. Meaning, to facilitate the highest level of performance and ultimately improve public safety, trainers must first familiarize themselves with the latest research and incorporate random practice into their training programs. By challenging officers with various skill choices, trainers can enhance officers’ adaptability, decision-making, and ability to apply techniques effectively. With random practice, we expect to elevate the skill and the transfer of those skills from the training room to the operating environment.  Outcomes that will both protect our officers and the communities they serve.

Join me at SHOT Show next year, where we will continue to discuss the science of learning and the advantages of constraint-led approach to training.

Law enforcement staffing issues are problematic across the nation (McMahon, 2022). This creates not only a vacuum for appropriate community services but puts a challenge on completing vital quality training for the officers. Without this quality training, it will be hard to meet the expectations of the community for high levels of performance. Vital training, such the use of force, de-escalation, and mental illness, is necessary to ensure the best outcomes possible. Agencies already fighting to get appropriate training time will have to ensure not only the appropriateness of the topics but also the methods. Using scientifically-backed methodologies such as spacing effect and deliberate practice can ensure that the training sticks and that training time are beneficial and maximized.

The spacing effect is a well-known phenomenon that describes the benefits of distributing practice sessions over time. According to this effect, learning is more effective when practice sessions are spaced out rather than massed together. This effect has been demonstrated across various skill domains, including sports, music, and language learning. What is the spacing effect, and how does it relate to deliberate practice? How does the spacing effect influence learning outcomes in skills training and deliberate practice?

Overview of the Spacing Effect in Skills Training

The spacing effect refers to the finding that distributing practice sessions over time leads to better retention and transfer of learning than massing practice sessions together (Cepeda et al., 2006). In other words, learning is more effective when practice is spaced out over time rather than massed together in one session. Engaging in four sessions that are 50 minutes long can have a much larger influence on performance that one training session that is 4 hours long.  The spacing effect is based on the idea that forgetting occurs over time, learning can be layered on top of learning once it is consolidated, and that spaced practice helps to counteract forgetting and promote the retention of information (Dempster, 1988).

Research on the spacing effect has demonstrated that spacing practice sessions lead to better long-term retention of learning, even when the total amount of practice is constant (Cepeda et al., 2006). The effect is most potent when the spacing intervals are optimized for the individual and the task being learned (Kang et al., 2014). The spacing effect has been observed in various skill domains, including sports, music, and language learning.

One study by Spruit et al. (2015) examined the effect of spaced versus massed practice on the learning of laparoscopy skills. The study found that spaced practice was more effective than massed practice. This learning can be enhanced and more pronounced when participants engage in deliberate practice. Specifically, the authors found that the spacing effect is more substantial for participants who engaged in deliberate practice as opposed to those who practiced without a specific goal or structure. This finding suggests that deliberate practice may enhance the benefits of spaced practice, as individuals who engage in the deliberate practice are more likely to optimize the spacing intervals and use feedback to guide their learning.

Spacing of training is facilitated when the training platform is easily accessible. Quick use of the training venue could facilitate an extended briefing style training of 15-45 minutes, or where micro-training sessions can occur in 10-15 minutes (Wang et al., 2020), with little or no impact on staffing or overtime. Not every agency has easy access to a firearms range, force-on-force facility, or role-players. That is where comprehensive tools like the VirTra simulator and the integration of the NCP-certified V-VICTA® curriculum can come in. The power of a tool like the V-ST PRO® or the V-300® is that it can facilitate this extended briefing training or micro-learning opportunities. Maintaining a training system in the briefing room eliminates travel time; using the V-marksmanship and the “Red Dot Optic” program eliminates range setup time and then weapon and range cleanup time. With live weapons being secured for this type of training, it can also be a time for weapon inspections as well as mandatory downloads or system uploads for other technologies.

Overview of Deliberate Practice

Deliberate practice is a training method emphasizing the importance of effortful practice, feedback, and deliberate effort to improve performance (Ericsson, Krampe, & Tesch-Römer, 1993). According to the deliberate practice approach, individuals can improve their performance in any skill domain through a focused and structured practice designed to challenge their existing abilities and provide feedback on their progress (Ericsson, 2006).

Research on deliberate practice has demonstrated that this approach leads to better performance outcomes in a variety of skill domains, including music (Ericsson, Krampe, & Tesch-Römer, 1993), sports (Baker & Horton, 2004), and chess (Charness, 1981). Deliberate practice emphasizes the importance of quality over quantity of practice and requires individuals to engage in a purposeful practice designed to challenge their existing abilities and promote growth (Ericsson, 2006).

Once again, systems like the VirTra V-300 facilitate deliberate practice. Effortful practice is more than just rout practice. Deliberate practice is difficult and focused and requires buy-in from the participant. The feedback component for deliberate practice is enhanced with the use of the TMaR system. This video and audio playback system allows the coach (instructor) the ability to dive into the detail of the participant’s performance without the risk of missing important details. The playback can also be used to force the participant to evaluate and then diagnose their own faults and understand them at a deeper level. This provides a vital opportunity for the participant and can enhance learning.

In summary, the spacing effect and deliberate practice can work together to optimize learning outcomes in skills training. Deliberate practice can provide a structured approach to learning and optimize the spacing intervals, while spaced practice can enhance long-term retention and transfer of learning. These factors can help individuals achieve their learning goals and improve their performance in various skill domains (Roediger & Butler, 2011). Law enforcement cannot afford to engage in empty training that lacks any true transformation. Understanding and then applying the science of learning a skill to a high level of performance is what must be done.

References:

  • Baker, J., & Horton, S. (2004). A review of primary and secondary influences on sport expertise. High Ability Studies, 15, 211 – 228.
  • Cepeda, N. J., Pashler, H., Vul, E., Wixted, J. T., & Rohrer, D. (2006). Distributed practice in verbal recall tasks: A review and quantitative synthesis. Psychological Bulletin, 132(3), 354–380. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.132.3.354
  • Charness, N. (1981). Search in chess: Age and skill differences. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 7(2), 467–476. https://doi.org/10.1037/0096-1523.7.2.467
  • Dempster, F. N. (1988). The spacing effect: A case study in the failure to apply the results of psychological research. American Psychologist, 43(8), 627–634. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.43.8.627
  • Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4–58. https://doi.org/10.1177/1529100612453266
  • Ericsson, K. A. (2006). The influence of experience and deliberate practice on the development of superior expert performance. In K. A. Ericsson, N. Charness, P. J. Feltovich, & R. R. Hoffman (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of expertise and expert performance (pp. 683–703). Cambridge University Press.
  • Ericsson, K. A., Krampe, R. T., & Tesch-Römer, C. (1993). The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological Review, 100(3), 363–406. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.100.3.363
  • Hallam, S., Price, J., & Katsarou, G. (2002). The effects of background music on primary school pupils’ task performance. Educational Studies, 28(2), 111–122. https://doi.org/10.1080/03055690220137085
  • Kang, S. H. K., Lindsey, R. V., Mozer, M. C., & Pashler, H. (2014). Retrieval practice over the long term: Should spacing be expanding or equal-interval? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(6), 1544–1550. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-014-0636-z
  • Macnamara, B. N., Hambrick, D. Z., & Oswald, F. L. (2014). Deliberate practice and performance in music, games, sports, education, and professions: A meta-analysis. Psychological Science, 25(8), 1608–1618. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797614535810
  • McMahon, J. (2022). Law Enforcement as a Career Choice Among Undergraduate Criminal Justice Students at Texas State University (Doctoral dissertation, Walden University).
  • Roediger III, H. L., & Butler, A. C. (2011). The critical role of retrieval practice in long-term retention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 15(1), 20-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2010.09.0
  • Son, L. K., & Simon, D. A. (2012). Distributed Learning: Data, Metacognition, and Educational Implications. Educational Psychology Review, 24(3), 379–399. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10648-012-9206-y
  • Spruit, E.N., Band, G.P.H. & Hamming, J.F. Increasing efficiency of surgical training: effects of spacing practice on skill acquisition and retention in laparoscopy training. Surgical Endoscopy 29, 2235–2243 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-014-3931-x
  • Wang, C., Bakhet, M., Roberts, D., Gnani, S., & El-Osta, A. (2020). The efficacy of microlearning in improving self-care capability: a systematic review of the literature. Public Health, 186, 286–296. https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2020.07.007

Expansion of Scenario and Character Libraries, Coupled with Recoil Kit Enhancements, Highlights VirTra’s Active Drive to Elevate Realism in Training

 

CHANDLER, Ariz. — January 18, 2024 — VirTra, Inc. (Nasdaq: VTSI) (“VirTra” or the “Company”), a global provider of judgmental use of force training simulators, firearms training simulators for the law enforcement and military markets, today announced new video-based scenarios for its training simulators and unveiled its True-Fire™ recoil kit, which is designed to minimize false firing incidents. Alongside this, the Company is expanding its V-Author® library by adding 27 new characters, including hospital and corrections workers, as well as community members, patients, and inmates. The new content and True-Fire™ recoil kits are set to launch at SHOT Show on January 23-26 at the Venetian Expo in Las Vegas, Booth #20535.

The newest video-based scenarios encompass a variety of situations such as active shooters, suspicious subjects, disturbances, duty to intervene, traffic stops, and more. Available in 4K resolution, these scenarios give law enforcement members a crystal-clear, highly immersive view of the action. Each scenario is crafted using top-tier cinematic equipment and professional actors, enhancing the realism of the training experience. Furthermore, the entire production process – from writing and filming to quality assurance – involves subject matter experts at each stage to ensure each scenario is accurate and effective for learning.

VirTra CEO John Givens stated: “Training content needs to align with the specific mission that individuals and teams are trying to accomplish, which is why we’re producing content that closely mirrors real-world scenarios. VirTra is hyper-focused on the production of superior scenarios and character, tailored for the unique needs of law enforcement, corrections, and hospital staff. We’ve invested in state-of-the-art equipment, skilled personnel, and subject matter experts, and we regularly survey our customers to ensure that our content is effective and of the highest quality. Every piece of content we produce is crafted to ensure our clients are trained effectively no matter what their state or agency policies require.”

One notable scenario equips officers and security personnel to handle active threats at places of worship. In this immersive simulation, officers respond to multiple reports of an active shooter. They must navigate the scenario by engaging threats while simultaneously being aware of fleeing innocents, testing their ability to make split-second decisions about potential threats. The scenario also incorporates elements of de-escalation and hostage negotiation, further diversifying the training experience and providing situational awareness that is challenging to replicate outside this immersive environment. To address various training objectives, the multiple incidents within this single scenario have been divided into three sections, each focusing on different training points.

V-Author® is VirTra’s scenario authoring tool that allows users to create their own scenarios using just a panoramic image. This user-friendly tool lets instructors drag and drop characters into the scene and assign them specific actions. Enhancing this capability, VirTra has added 27 new characters to the V-Author® library. This includes 18 characters tailored for the hospital industry and 9 designed specifically for the jails and corrections industry. Each character comes with a range of actions, providing instructors with the flexibility to tailor scenarios to specific training objectives. The expanded roster of V-Author® characters reflects VirTra’s commitment to supporting training needs in various sectors, especially for hospital staff, security personnel, and corrections officers.

These characters are created using VirTra’s state-of-the-art Volumetric Capture Studio, which captures the true likeness of real actors. Thanks to this innovative technology, the video-based characters seamlessly integrate into various training formats. They can drag and drop the characters to be readily incorporated into both traditional video scenarios and VirTra’s headset-based virtual reality product, V-XR®.

In addition to the new training content, VirTra is introducing True-Fire™, a mechanical enhancement to its recoil kits. This feature, designed to minimize false firing incidents, is a significant advancement in training realism. True-Fire™ includes upgraded materials and firmware/software improvements to prevent unintentional shot registration when a weapon is slid, tapped, or dropped during simulations. Many tetherless recoil kits on the market typically register false fire which skew the results in the final training evaluations, and VirTra has created a proprietary solution that will debut at SHOT Show.

If you would like to have a demonstration of VirTra’s newest technology and content, email sales@virtra.com or stop by Booth #20535 at SHOT Show.

 

About VirTra, Inc.

VirTra (Nasdaq: VTSI) is a global provider of judgmental use of force training simulators and firearms training simulators for the law enforcement, military, educational and commercial markets. The company’s patented technologies, software, and scenarios provide intense training for de-escalation, judgmental use-of-force, marksmanship, and related training that mimics real-world situations. VirTra’s mission is to save and improve lives worldwide through practical and highly effective virtual reality and simulator technology. Learn more about the company at www.VirTra.com.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

The information in this discussion contains forward-looking statements and information within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, which are subject to the “safe harbor” created by those sections. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “projects,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Actual results or events could differ materially from the plans, intentions and expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements that we make. The forward-looking statements are applicable only as of the date on which they are made, and we do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements in this document are made based on our current expectations, forecasts, estimates and assumptions, and involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause results or events to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. In evaluating these statements, you should specifically consider various factors, uncertainties and risks that could affect our future results or operations. These factors, uncertainties and risks may cause our actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statement set forth in the reports we file with or furnish to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). You should carefully consider these risks and uncertainties described and other information contained in the reports we file with or furnish to the SEC before making any investment decision with respect to our securities. All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement.

 

Investor Relations Contact:

Matt Glover and Alec Wilson

Gateway Group, Inc.

VTSI@gateway-grp.com

949-574-3860

To deliver the best possible training experience to our clients, we have partnered with industry experts. These partnerships have provided additional expertise in various certified V-VICTA curriculum offered.

Partners include:

  • Force Science – Courses including “Weapon Transitions” and “Human Factors” were co-authored by the experts at Force Science – a widely-known law enforcement research, training, and consulting company.
  • Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center – Due to the need to support interactions between law enforcement and people on the autism spectrum, VirTra partnered with SARRC to provide curriculum to teach officers how to safely and effectively communicate with people on the spectrum.
  • National Sheriff’s Association – VirTra has worked alongside NSA to develop training focused on dog encounters. While not a certified course, it is the first of its kind that includes interactive scenarios and lessons on how to distinguish dog behavior.
  • Aimpoint® – A mounted optic provider, Aimpoint assisted VirTra in the creation of the “Red Dot Optic Training & Sustainment” course by allowing the utilization of their pistol mounted red dot optics. Aimpoint is recognized as the originator of red dot sight technology.
  • Victory First – VirTra developed the “Red Dot Optic Training & Sustainment” course in conjunction with Victory First owner Matt Jacques – a retired officer and U.S. Marine veteran. Victory First trains law enforcement as well as responsible firearm owners.

VirTra has also worked with Haley Strategic and Action Target for applying lessons learned in the simulator to the real world. Whether it is decision-making or marksmanship, the important part of training is that it can be transferred to reality.

We appreciate and thank our partners for their contributions to our training, making it more sustainable and trustworthy.

VirTra will be at SHOT Show 2024 to demonstrate our simulators and accessories that help train law enforcement and military all around the globe.

All this is happening at Booth #20535 at The Venetian Expo – Level 2 on January 23-26:

You can also find our V-100® at Action Target – Booth #12816 where a Marksmanship Challenge will be hosted! It will be open all four days during the exhibit hours of the show, and each day there will be a winner. Winners will receive amazing prizes such as a Vortex Red Dot Pistol Optic and a Goat Gun!

If you would like to reserve a 15-minute demo, contact us so we can put you on the schedule!

SHOT Show LEEP Presentation

We also welcome you to attend a LEEP presentation by VirTra’s Lon Bartel and Force Science’s Von Kliem. Hear about the best practices for law enforcement training and gain valuable insight on adult learning.

Active shootings in general have been on the rise in recent years, and that includes churches, temples, mosques, and other houses of worship. The uptick in active threats has made people understandably uneasy, with some places of worship adding armed security.

One of America’s deadliest mass shootings took place in Sutherland Springs, TX in 2017 at the First Baptist Church. Tragically, 26 people were killed when a gunman opened fire. An article by USA Today listed fairly recent attacks on houses of worship:

  • Congregation Beth Israel synagogue, TX – January 2022
  • Chabad of Poway synagogue, CA – April 2019
  • Two mosques in New Zealand – March 2019
  • Tree of Life synagogue, PA – October 2018

The variations of location and religion show that this type of attack can happen anywhere and to any place of worship. It may be unknown if the acts are driven by hate, mental instability or a combination of both, either way, it is an unfortunate reality.

Simulation Training for Active Threats

VirTra’s “Mass Chaos” scenario was released in October 2023 for the V-300®, and now it is available for the V-180® and V-100® as well. This is another addition to our existing library of active threat scenarios, such as those that involve an active shooter at movie theaters and schools.

Mass Chaos is a scenario that will truly bring users’ heart rates up. In this scenario, 911 calls are reporting an active shooter situation at a local church. When entering, there will be an immediate engagement with an active threat. As the officers move through the church, there will be other engagements including hostages, fleeing civilians, and opportunities to make quick decisions.

There are several training points in Mass Chaos such as hostage negotiation, stress inoculation, situational awareness, and communication. Due to this, the scenario has also been broken down into three additional smaller scenarios available in all 3 simulators.

  • Church Crisis – User must quickly and effectively engage threats with deadly force, as well as make split second decisions on whether someone is a threat or not.
  • Holy Hostage – Officer will face a hostage situation that must be quickly resolved.
  • Holy Moly – Officers and church security must work together to clear a church during an active threat situation.

These scenarios are brand new and will be added to your library during your next service trip. If you’d like to learn more about the new content or update your service plan, contact a specialist.